What Makes a Great Villain, or Build Your Own Bad Guy.

A villain is the opposite of a hero. A villain is the antagonist of your story whose motivations and actions oppose the protagonist and drive the plot of your story. A villain is the opposite of a hero. In contrast to the hero, a villain is usually compelled by a desire to commit acts of cruelty and immorality.

How To Write A Villain

Writing Villains Using the Villain Archetype. The villain, like the fool, is a classic archetype seen in almost every story from Shakespeare to Disney to films like 27 Dresses. However, unlike the fool, the villain has no consistent character traits. They are a shadow version of the hero, and their personality morphs based on the strengths and.

How To Write A Villain

Writing the villain with the consciousness that he is actively involved as the hero of his own story will make your villain more realistic, interesting, and compelling. The villain stops being the obligatory bad guy, and becomes the opposing force on a collision course with your protagonist.

How To Write A Villain

An outside threat. The villain might be unable to defeat a large threat by themself, so they’re motivated to make peace with Team Good and, in doing so, gain powerful allies. An order by a superior. The villain could have been ordered by their master to spy on Team Good. The Villain Is Unhappy in Team Good.

How To Write A Villain

Introducing the villain. by Peircen Williams (Auburndale, FL, USA) Hey I've been trying to figure this out. I am 16 and completely new to writing but I have an outstanding imagination that I feel is going to waste so i decided to write a fantasy novel series. In my series the main character is a 15 year old boy who has just recently discovered.

How To Write A Villain

How to Write a Villain.. I've heard writers say that a villain is the hero of his own story, and I think that is a good beginning point for writing a villain. You as the author do not have to agree with the villain's point of view, however, and you can make that very clear, no matter what POV you are writing in.

How To Write A Villain

Follow this rule: if the audience understands the desire, the villain has a point, and thus, is not that much of a villain when people think about it. At the same time, a villian with a valid point can be a great way to make a sympathetic villian likable or to make the story's morality a bit less black-and-white.

How To Write a Killer Villain - SAMANTHA ALLAKER.

How To Write A Villain

Hello boys and girls, your friendly neighborhood Ravager here to give you all a few tips on how to write compelling villains for your heroes. This is a part of Irishlad's How to Write Fan-Fiction.

How To Write A Villain

The villain can be tormented by his past and hell-bent on some other goal which he's just using to try and deal with the old trauma. The villain can become a nihilist and expressing how nothing matters good or bad everything is relative and it doesn't matter if he kills a woman or loves her. (Ex.

How To Write A Villain

Being a villain may be their life’s work, but they also do other things on the side; there isn’t a villain who should be only evil and nothing else. Maybe your villain likes knitting. Fishing. Maybe your villain is very family-oriented. Maybe your villain is very smart.

How To Write A Villain

Welcome to Writing Tip Wednesdays, where I post (you guessed it) tips on writing every Wednesday at 5:00 PM ET. This week’s topic: Happy New Year, everyone! We’re starting out the new year with Part Two of our series on Writing Believable Villains (Part 1: THE 7 WAYS TO WRITE A BELIEVABLE VILLAIN.).

How To Write A Villain

Villain protagonists are exactly what they sound like: characters who exhibit the traits of villains, but who are the central characters of the story. It can be a writer’s experiment in examining the other side of the traditional hero-villain dynamic (as in Wicked ), or maybe the writer has decided that whatever the protagonist is fighting is even worse than their main character.

How To Write A Villain

So until I, or someone else, gets around to writing that guide, here are three key points to remember when creating your villain: The villain is the hero of his own story, therefore he needs a speech. The villain owns the middle build. The villain can be external, social, internal or all of the above.

How To Write A Villain

Simply put, a villain is someone (or something) that is willing to do harm to others in order to reach their goals. Now, as with most things, there's depth to that-- your heroes are willing to harm people as well, sometimes, and not all villains will kill at the drop of a hat.

How To Write A Sympathetic Villain - Standout Books.

Alternatively, a villain can be given great depth and more threat if you show that their character is also up to the challenge, whether it's because they, as the hero of their own story, show equally righteous motives as the hero, or because they, as the illest of villains, are so dastardly devious and wretched that they can't be defeated except by the noble hero.Get the audience behind the villain the same way you would for any of your other characters. I'm seeing the advice that the villain thinks they are the hero all over this thread. That's basically what I'm saying to. The way you make a sympathetic villain is essentially the same as the way you make a sympathetic hero.A villain’s backstory doesn’t always make it into the book. Whether you are going to write it in or not, you have to know their story as well as you know the hero’s. Without a backstory neither you nor the reader will care for the villain, or sympathise with them. Ultimately, you need to make your readers sympathise with the bad guy.


Try these tips for writing complex villains. 38. Creating villain motivations: Writing real adversaries. How do you make your villain’s bad deeds more believable? By giving them believable villain motivations. 39. How to write a character unlike you. Sometimes you need to write a character completely unlike you.Instead of focusing on the villain being a gay villain, emphasize that he is person who lost the person he cares about most. Convey to me that his descent into madness is from pain, not from homosexuality. People should not be defined by their race, gender, or sexual orientation but rather their actions.